NPR and PBS- the news, shows, and who pays for them

Discuss Current Events, Politics, Theology, Science, Society, Philosophy, Culture, etc. Please stay on-topic. Serious discussions/debates only. No personal attacks.
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Corgimom
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Postby Corgimom » Sat May 14, 2016 5:30 pm

Forward- CPR

CPB is part of the big picture for public broadcasting
CPB is the steward of the federal government’s investment in public broadcasting and the largest single source of funding for public radio, television, and related online and mobile services.

CPB’s mission is to ensure universal access to non-commercial, high-quality content and telecommunications services. It does so by distributing more than 70% of its funding to more than 1,400 locally owned public radio and television stations.

Since 1968, CPB has been the steward of the federal government’s investment in public broadcasting and the largest single source of funding for public radio, television, and related online and mobile services. For approximately $1.35 per American per year, CPB provides essential operational support for the nearly 1,400 locally-owned and -operated public television and radio stations, which reach virtually every household in the country.
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Corgimom
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Postby Corgimom » Sat May 14, 2016 5:33 pm

NPR Radio
NPR- National Puiblic Radio

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Public radio at a national level was transformed from the poor kid in town to a world news player with a bequest of more than $200 million from the estate of philanthropist Joan B. Kroc, believed to be the largest monetary gift ever received by an American cultural institution.

Shows like Morning Edition, All Things Considered, Weekend Edition and All Things Considered on weekends are top ter shows
Non-newsmagazine program fees (for example, Fresh Air, the Global Village and shows like the most award winning Jazz show in history China Road)

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NPR Member stations- your local stations- rely most heavily on contributions from listeners.

Information from http://www.npr.org/about-npr/178660742/public-radio-finances.

My personal radio history includes a few years on the NPR world music weekend show the Global Village with it's founding host Wade Gordon.
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Corgimom
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Postby Corgimom » Sat May 14, 2016 6:59 pm

PBS receives 2% of its annual budget from federal resources. Most funding for PBS programs comes from a variety of sources - member stations' dues, the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, government agencies, foundations, corporations and private citizens.

They did not have any pie charts but they do have a great page giving show submission guidelines.
http://www.pbs.org/about/producing-pbs/proposal-process/

They are a big market for documentaries, news, international programing and education.

Local affiliates do local niche shows too.

The kids education series might be of particular interest to some of you.

They were airing Doctor Who as far back as I can remember too.

Some of the highest standards are meet at-
http://www.pbs.org/shows/
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Skywalker
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Postby Skywalker » Sat May 14, 2016 7:06 pm

PBS is also used by teachers as well.
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Corgimom
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Postby Corgimom » Sat May 14, 2016 7:13 pm

My personal favorite shows from NPR

The only news shows I make a point to tune in-
All Things Considered

Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!

TED Radio Hour
This hour, TED speakers explore ... TED Radio Hour Podcast.

Weekend Edition Saturday

The American Master Series is brought to us by PBS (da bomb)
This old house and many similar programs began on PBS
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Corgimom
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Postby Corgimom » Sat May 14, 2016 7:44 pm

Skywalker wrote:PBS is also used by teachers as well.

For sure! PBS offered the first interactive distance college classes- long before the internet. I took college Algebra from Miami dade and the teacher lectured in front of a chalkboard with a phone on the desk so registered students could call in at the last of the Broadcast. It was a local show 2 morning a week.
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Skywalker
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Postby Skywalker » Sat May 14, 2016 8:36 pm

wiki wrote:

The very rapid spread of film in the 1920s and radio in the 1930s led to proposals to use it for distance education.[35] By 1938, at least 200 city school systems, 25 state boards of education, and many colleges and universities broadcast educational programs for the public schools.[36] One line of thought was to use radio as a master teacher.

" Experts in given fields broadcast lessons for pupils within the many schoolrooms of the public school system, asking questions, suggesting readings, making assignments, and conducting tests. This mechanizes education and leaves the local teacher only the tasks of preparing for the broadcast and keeping order in the classroom."[37]
A typical setup came in Kentucky in 1948 when John Wilkinson Taylor, president of the University of Louisville, teamed up with the National Broadcasting Corporation to use radio as a medium for distance education, The chairman of the Federal Communications Commission endorsed the project and predicted that the "college-by-radio" would put "American education 25 years ahead." The University was owned by the city, and local residents would pay the low tuition rates, receive their study materials in the mail, and listen by radio to live classroom discussions that were held on campus.[38]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Distance_education



I only know about the Uni of Louisville aspect because I went there and saw a display about it. It was cutting edge technology at the time. It also gave poor black folks a chance to gain an education. If I remember correctly, I do not think that uofL was segregated as it started off as a school for black girls.


On the topic of PBS/NPR support them yo. Without them, I would not have grown up with Mr. Rogers or the other shows that came on like Were in the World is Carmon Sando. I do not listen to NPR all that often because I am never in a car.
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Postby Corgimom » Sun May 15, 2016 2:53 am

When PBS talks about local programing it is mostly education, local news, a touch of entertainment. PBS is the opposite end of the spectrum from network or cable.

I have a little solar radio that I like to use when I sit outside, have my coffee, play with the dogs and listen to the news.
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Postby anynoise » Sun May 15, 2016 6:17 pm

Most Watched: Charlie Rose and Austin City Limits. Sometimes Masterpiece Theater and Great Performances. I think the biggest contribution (to all Americans) is the Children's Programming. I grew up watching it, but I had 5 channels via an antenna (we lived out in the middle of nowhere). It may be different now for kids with cable? I love both PBS and NPR. NPR was a staple radio station for me in the morning when I had a long commute. Morning radio shows are the worst.
My opinion: money well spent.
"I'm sick of following my dreams. I'm just going to ask them where they're goin', and hook up with them later." [em]~Mitch Hedberg[/em]
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Postby PhlawlessPhelon » Mon May 16, 2016 5:18 am

Great post, I learned a lot.
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Postby bigsexywzp » Wed May 18, 2016 6:38 am

I listen to Morning Edition almost every morning on my way home from work. Since I do work and live in a college town, there are some local shows at the University radio station that deal with local music (which Athens is definitely known for), as well as local science shows that talk about various research projects going on at UGA. I also manage to catch Weekend Edition Saturday on my way home from my "Friday" shift.

If I was running late? I was able to listen to replays of Car Talk on Saturdays as well. You could learn so much from the hosts, just by listening to them explain how things worked.

As for television? I love PBS's offerings of documentaries. Frontline, NOVA, and Nature are some of the best things on television. I wish my wife and daughter were as interested in documentaries and learning as I am. We could spend weekends binge watching documentaries as a family.

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